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Begin With the End in Mind

3x3 Begin with the End in Mind

Beginning with the end in mind means getting in touch with your deepest core values and clearly visualizing what you want.

Let’s apply visualization to our financial life: Are you where you want to be financially? To make a financial shift, you will need to open your mind to change and new possibilities. Once you determine what goals you would like to achieve, planning the next steps is key to success.

I believe that one of the most important ways to bring about change is through visualization. This technique involves envisioning your future with a new perspective (rather than as an extension of your current reality). You may see yourself with an abundance of money or paid up on all your credit card debt or driving a new car. If you can’t visualize how your future could be, it is difficult to believe you can take the necessary steps to get there.

Many people say that you only need to believe in something to make it come true. Here is something that should come as no secret to most of you: success requires consistent effort.

Yes, I believe that it is important to visualize your future in order to make changes. However, if your reality keeps reflecting something different than what you envision, you may need to put in a few more hours or revise your strategy.

Envision what you want, tell yourself it can happen and draft a plan. Here’s a great example:

Sam, a client of mine, had always wanted to own his own business. He didn’t have specific details; he just knew he had a dream. Sam worked in a business park and there was no convenient place for a quick lunch. Each day, he’d come to work and think, “This place needs a sandwich shop.” He realized there might be an opportunity to open his own business and began to envision the details of his dream.

He made some plans and worked out all of the financial details for his own sandwich shop. He would offer a limited variety of Panini sandwiches (two types of cheese, two types of meat), canned soda or bottled water, and two types of chips. He determined that meal prices at ten dollars or less would attract lunch customers. He decided to lease four Panini machines for the first six months (rather than purchase them) in case the restaurant didn’t work out.

He needed a certain amount saved up before launching his plan. If the business took off in six months, he would continue building his sandwich shop business. If not, he would be able to get out without long-term debt. His exit strategy was in place. He saw a need and envisioned himself filling it. To his credit, Sam now owns a thriving sandwich shop.

What are your goals for this summer season? Setting your end result first will pave the way for change!
Bob