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Facing Your Financial Fears

The Money Nerve
Facing Your Financial Fears

Facing Your Financial Fears

We all have money habits ingrained in our lives, yet many of us are afraid of facing financial fears. Financial fear is often caused by emotional response that we unconsciously carry with us, and facing your financial fear is the first step to eliminating stress and worry.

There are dozens of emotions that surface when it comes to money. When I was thinking back on the emotions I have dealt with in client meetings over the years, I came up with an extensive list. But one emotion seems to crop up more often than others. It’s exhaustion. Looking at the root cause of our financial actions can be exhausting. Being broke can be exhausting. Budgeting can be exhausting.

Exhaustion

Many people have a message in their mind stuck on replay, and it says, “I don’t want to look at my financial reality. I just don’t want to look at how messed up I actually am.” It seems less exhausting to live in a make-believe world! The problem with that assumption is that it’s a fantasy. As soon as you get an overdraft fee – BAM! Welcome to the real world. Dealing with reality out of fear makes you may feel even more de- energized and defeated.

Turn your exhaustion around:

• Analyze your true situation. Don’t spend money before you receive it.
• Have a contingency plan
• Create a strategy to move in a new direction.
• Investigate smarter personal finance tips and tools

Determine where your “MONEY NERVE” is by facing Your Financial Fears

1. Write down a recent, uncomfortable Money Nerve moment and analyze how you might have mitigated the emotions behind it and improved the situation.
2. Start a journal to track your money habits and emotions
3. Make a list of people in your inner circle of family and friends with whom you could discuss finances.
4. Make a list of professionals who could provide financial advice, maybe a CPA or a financial advisor.
5. Pick the three strongest emotions that trigger your Money Nerve. Mentally trace them back to what you believe to be the root cause. For example, “My father got angry whenever we wanted to eat out.”
A.
B.
C.
6. Write down a recent, uncomfortable Money Nerve moment and analyze how you might have mitigated the emotions behind it and improved the situation.
7. Review your journal entries to identify other emotions that trigger your Money Nerve.

Becoming more aware of the emotions that trigger your Money Nerve will create new options for making positive change in your life!