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Money and Happiness

money and happinessMoney and Happiness

How can I find my financial fitness?

Money and happiness can co-exist. And, while financial security may seem like it’s unattainable, you may simply be in need of a little perspective. The cure for being financially overwhelmed is mindful persistence and knowledge.

If you have particular financial issues that overwhelm you, surround yourself with books on the subject or go online to reputable sites like The Money Nerve to find tools and resources. If you are more inclined to face-to-face discussion, try to find people who are strong in your area of weakness.

The way to a savings account is one step at a time. Be mindful and intentional with the small steps you take; these will create great change in your life. Put away ten dollars per paycheck knowing that, over time, that will add up to a large sum. In that way, you can create a new habit. Habits practiced on a daily basis create structure and lead you to take different actions. Intentional choices with your money, your time and your energy create a fuller, well rounded lifestyle.

Financial stability may not happen overnight. By setting goals and starting the journey, you will figure out that you are only a short distance away from relief. Just put one foot in front of the other and get moving.

Turn your overwhelming feelings around:

  • Know where you are and where you are going.
  • Learn the financial terrain.
  • Persist.

Can I have money and happiness?

Many studies have analyzed the connection between wealth and happiness. After reviewing several major studies, Melanie Greenberg (in a recent article in The Mindful Self-Express) comes to the conclusion that money is only one ingredient in our happiness quotient. She notes: Money does not make as much difference as we think. When researchers asked people earning $25,000 how much happier they would be if they earned $55,000, most people said their happiness would more than double. However, when actual happiness scores were compared, those earning $55,000 were only about 10 percent happier. So, money does make you happier, but much less than we often fantasize about.

To move us away from the materialistic aspects of wealth, perhaps we should focus our attention on what we do with that wealth –– however much it is. Wealth can bring more freedom to make choices and to determine how we want to use our time. Money and happiness can be achieved. By gaining perspective and finding joy in life beyond our finances; maybe helping others financially or spending quality time with family on a vacation –– we learn to savor how we employ our money for ourselves and others.

Savor Life

Make savoring life’s little pleasures your goal. Create plans for how to inject more zest into each day, and you will significantly increase your happiness and well-being — and, in many cases, your own wealth. And if your riches aren’t growing, then reveling in, and relishing each day is still a great way to truly appreciate what you do have.