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Give the Gift of Time

3x3-christmas-starsThis year, Give the Gift of Time!

Choosing to make conscious choices for your money and life may have implications for many aspects of your life. Consider giving the gift of time this year. Create a mental space to listen to your thoughts. Decide how to spend the last ten days of your holiday season, using your goals to give you focus.

Visualize your “perfect” holiday. Maybe it includes parties with friends, spending time with family, or taking the time to express your gratitude. December is such a hectic time of year. Many people feel overwhelmed by obligations presented by school, work, family, and friends. Invest your time in activities that bring you the most value.

Choose which activities you will spend your time on and know that you may miss some parties or invites. Setting boundaries for a successful holiday helps you maintain your sanity, increase your sense of gratefulness and keep your “spirits bright!”

Take that one step further and give the gift of time with those closest to you this month. Listen to your spouse, best friend or family members and notice what is important to them. Investing time with people who are special in your life strengthens your bond with them, creating more meaningful relationships.

When shopping, purchase one item and plan an experience to accompany the gift – instead of buying multiple gifts for everyone. Purchasing a new sweater? Plan a date night to enjoy the new outfit. Have a friend who loves to cook? Wrap up a kitchen gadget and sign up for a cooking class together. Give a gift of time to complete the gift in a box! Many people find that spending time with others reaps greater benefits in the journey of life.

Share some of the activities that your family or circle of friends love to do — and make the holidays extra special every year.

Happy Holiday!

Bob

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THE VALUE OF TIME

 

3x3 Value of Time

How do you value your time?

What does time mean to you? Do you give your time a value?

I am not just speaking about an hourly wage; I am talking about all the hours in your life. Life is full of activities, challenges, distractions, and obstacles every day. Many people feel they could use a “double” to get everything done. 

A 2008 Forbes article looks at this dilemma, “Time is the most valuable commodity. We never seem to have enough of it. Everyone is time-strapped, time-poor, time-starved. Choose your cliché. Most of us don’t make the most of our time. We wish we did. A self-help industry has flourished on the hope that even if we can’t make more time–the 24 hours in a day remain immutable–we can at least make the most of what we have. Even the most ardent makers of “to-do” lists fritter time away.

Which raises this question to fill an idle moment: Why don’t we value time as we do any other good or service? We could then decide what we do with ours in the most cost-effective way: rationally maximizing our “return on time invested” (ROTI), if you will.”  {Tools for allocating assets}

Ben Franklin said, “Time is Money.” Substitute the word INVESTING for MONEY. Using the word investing as you delegate time may help you to place a higher value on people and experiences. Investing in yourself could be additional education, job training or saving for the future. Investing in relationships could mean scheduling time for valuable activities with family, friends or loved ones. By equating a value to time – it can alter the perspective of your intentions. Being young can give one the sense that everything will last forever, and family and friends will always be there. As people age, many develop a keen sense of time as friends move away or they experience the loss of a cousin, uncle or parent. In retrospect, the personal relationships take on a greater value.

An interesting way to value time is to compare it to a bank account where each person is given 86,400 seconds (dollars) to use each day. Time spent on long-term goals and life-building relations will count more in life. The time lost each night in your account is renewed with a current balance of seconds and minutes to be used again. Consequently, living each day with its sense of promise and possibilities, demands each hour to be lived to the fullest, being “in the present.”

Make space to truly cherish and live – at any particular moment – this week! Celebrate your family, your Mom and those people who you have chosen into your circle of family and loved ones. That is time well spent!

Yesterday is history
Tomorrow is mystery
Today is a gift
That is why it’s called the present!!

-Bob

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Build Your Dream Team

3x3 Being Financial PartnersMaking a plan for a rainy day is always prudent. Some examples might be stashing some money in a savings account, looking toward your retirement or setting aside a three-month supply of food so that you are covered in case of an emergency. Just don’t go overboard, and sacrifice living to the fullest in your present life for an unforeseeable future.

I think of my friend’s grandmother finding an envelope labeled Hawaii trip in her husband’s safe deposit box after he died. They never left mainland soil in his lifetime. He had plenty of money in the envelope; they had the time; he just waited too long to take action. His financial fears kept both of them from sharing unique and fulfilling experiences together.

Have you shared your dreams, your goals or even your credit score with your partner? Maybe it is time to sit down and have a face-to-face conversation about what is important to both of you. Make the time to explore how to make those dreams happen. You want to know what triggers stress in each other and be aware of emotions can trigger extreme reactions.

As you become more aware of your emotions and what triggers your Money Nerve, you will be able to be more understanding of your partner’s Money Nerve. You want to have a conversation with the goal of improving financial communication and a better understanding of the person you love. You may still get annoyed and even upset by the reactions of others— but know you have each other’s back to deal with your situation.

Many times, sharing your financial journey and goals with others can help keep you on track. Keeping a budget together with a common focus becomes fun with a partner because you can “team up” with one another to track receipts, and build a stronger portfolio. When you join forces, you can now plan on how and where to spend your cash, set goals for fulfilling each other’s dreams and laying the groundwork for a better future.